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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
, more conflict between them. >> the syrian government is under increasing pressure tonight. the american and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most p
training school. the free syrian army controls most of the land here, and so the 300 government troops inside know they are surrounded. no reinforcements to come. the rebels have already overrun other bases, and with each victory, they seek stronger weapons. this gives away their position. the gun is loaded, and the rebels take game. they miss and get ready to try again. a government new fighter jet has been spotted, and the fighters have to run for cover. although the government has been weakened, it has not been defeated, and we look at a fighter jet. it has been doing circles around. >> back in aleppo, the sun has set, and the streets start to empty. the power was cut days ago. as night falls, the dark and damp consumer the city. the few who do remain outside are still queueing for bread. they have been shelled and shot at, and as winter set in, they are cold, hungry, and desperate. normal life has been suspended. families hunkered down on building sites and in empty schools. railings for a washing line. a classroom for all home. refugees in their own city, where children sleep by c
, but nonetheless, you have the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what you were writing about on the bbc website. you point out that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how thi
we are hearing is the language of martyrdom. forces of an elected government struck down by those who opposed it. it is another sign of how polarizing egypt is becoming. at the heart of the crisis is president morsi giving him self immunity. he has called a referendum on the constitution. tonight, thousands of activists gathered outside the presidential palace. in scenes reminiscent of what happened when hosni mubarak was toppled, the soldiers provided a photo opportunity. here they have their heroes and those they call martyrs. from all of them the same accusation, the revolution was hijacked. >> he has broken all of his mandate. he has put himself above ala. he has done everything to break down his legitimacy. >> a country was united about the dictatorship is now divided over how to replace it. bbc news, cairo. >> from egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping. today, hillary clinton reiterated that president aside departure would be crucial. jeremy has been to a prison in damascus were some of the fighters are being held. this is his report. >> the soundtrack of the da
struggling. the government is doing nothing for them. ♪ [applause] to uneasy head does have its first freely elected party -- tunisia does have its first freely elected parliament. it is bogged down in political battles, including over the role of religion in the new state. the leading islamist insists the people's freedoms are not at risk. >> we do not believe the state should impose a way of life. what to wear, what to eat or drink, or what to believe. that is the role of society. the role of the state is to preserve our security, protect personal freedoms, and to provide services. >> this week, the lavish palaces of the former president go on sale. along with their glittering contents. the proceeds are supposed to go back to the people. this is literally the seat of power. at least one of many for the president lived and worked. sitting here, you would think he left just yesterday. it has been two years. the people are now too aware that bringing down a president is one thing. building a democracy is quite another. many are now asking what kind of country is being built. >> for more on wh
of the government against the people. >> earlier in the day on the other side of cairo, the president's own supporters were also out in force. they handed out copies of the controversial constitution, a document for all e egyptians. >> they have no discrimination whatsoever. >> major trouble was averted tonight because the groups were kept apart. in this divided country, a referendum on the constitution is due to take place on saturday. >> awhile protests continue to paralyzed parts of cairo, the capital damascus has renewed fighting. it has been two years since the uprising, tens of thousands have died. the middle east editor is in damascus and sent this report on the battle for an increasingly divided city. >> damascus is at the heart of the bloodiest arab uprising. they keep them under tight security that squeezes traffic down the main road. the capitals still functions. but the battle for damascus is under way. it is happening in the suburbs after months of shelling and air strikes. it is controlled by the rebels the claim they own about one- third of greater damascus. the rebels only h
kate's condition. the government confirmed it will be moving quickly to pass a law ensuring that if their first child is a girl, she will definitely be third in line to the throne. she will not be passed over by any younger brother. >> the old-fashioned rules where only a boy could become the king and his oldest sister would not be allowed to, the rules will be swept aside and that is change, and updating of the rules that many people would welcome. >> alan farthing was spotted. leading the treatment. >> it is one of the worst things i have ever gone through, bar none. it puts your body through minutes you never thought you have. i felt there were times when i felt like my body had been poisoned. >> for william but most particularly for kate, these are testing days. they know there will have the support of their families, of each other, and of millions of people who they have never met. bbc news at the king edward the seventh hospital. >> the duchess of cambridge spending a second night in hospital for morning sickness. it was famously called the fast as talk of jobs in the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)